Statement by Ambassador Dr. Maleeha Lodhi, Permanent Representative of Pakistan to the United Nations at the Security Council open debate on United Nations peacekeeping operations: ‘Women in Peacekeeping’ (11 April 2019)

Mr. President,

My delegation thanks Germany for convening today’s open debate on women in peacekeeping, an integral tool to achieve some of the priorities under the Women and Peace and Security agenda.

I also wish to convey our appreciation for Secretary General Antonio Guterres and other briefers for their insightful briefings.

Mr. President,

Beginning with Resolution 1325 (2000), there have, so far, been eight Security Council Resolutions articulating and moving forward the WPS agenda. Even as the international community has come together to collectively condemn acts of unimaginable horror, the sexual abuse of women and girls continues to be used as a tactic of war in conflicts across the world, including in my own region.

Mr. President,

As one of the world’s leading troop contributing countries, Pakistan has set the highest standards in fulfilling peacekeeping mandates, including protection of vulnerable segments of the population, especially women and children, from violence. We have always advocated integration of the gender perspective into the peace-building paradigm, with a view to promoting the comprehensive inclusive and sustainable peace.

Female peacekeepers from my country have already made a mark and shown themselves, alongside their male counterparts, to be competent, dedicated and professional. An outstanding example was Shahzadi Gulfam, the first-ever recipient of the UN’s International Female Police Peacekeeper’s award in 2011. We are proud of her service as indeed of all our Peacekeepers.

To share our experience and promote best practices in peacekeeping, we have established a Center for International Peace and Stability, offering specially designed modules to help peacekeepers respond effectively and protect innocent civilians from sexual violence. During the recently held Peacekeeping Ministerial, we also offered a Course for Female Military Observers at CIPS.

During her visit to Pakistan earlier this year, the President of the General Assembly, Maria Fernanda Espinosa, visited CIPs to interact with and learn more about the experiences of women Peacekeepers. It led to a rich discussion of ways to inspire more women to join Peacekeeping Missions.

Mr. President,

As a major TCC, let me make five specific points:

Mr. President,

For my country, protection of the vulnerable, including women and children, is not only a global peace and security imperative, it is also a solemn obligation. We remain resolute and steadfast to honour our commitments in this regard.

I thank you.